Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com2014-07-28T11:25:58umbracoLatest information from Canadean.enThe UK cannot sleep at night as we worry about health and billshttp://www.canadean.com/news/the-uk-cannot-sleep-at-night-as-we-worry-about-health-and-bills/Mon, 28 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/the-uk-cannot-sleep-at-night-as-we-worry-about-health-and-bills/As stress and sleep issues are becoming a common concern among UK consumers, many are in need for stress relieving and sleep enhancing products. According to Canadean, this development presents a great market opportunity for FMCG companies. 

A new Canadean survey finds that 38% of UK adults have sleep deprivation issues and 36% suffer from stress. Moreover, one in every five consumers with sleep issues have been suffering from sleep deprivation for more than six months. Participants indicate that their greatest concerns are health worries (44%) and worries of day-to-day bills (36%), closely followed by those worried about personal relationships (29%).

Sleep deprivation has consequences for economy

With one in five consumers suffering from sleep issues lasting over six months, there are a lot of implications that will eventually hit the economy. In the short-term sufferers may be drowsy with decreased performance and alertness, which will leave them prone to accidents in the workplace and more sick-days. In the long-term sleep deprivation can contribute towards more serious medical complaints such as high blood pressure, obesity and depression. This can be followed by higher levels of sickness and eventually sleep deprivation could reduce the UK labour force.

Stress relieving and sleep enhancing products present market opportunity

Mental well-being and sleep patterns remain a taboo subject across the majority of society, which only contributes to the stress that consumers are feeling. It reveals, however, that a large part of society is in need of stress relieving and sleep enhancing products. To combat stress, consumers are demanding solutions from FMCG companies which, in turn, need to be targeting these secret worriers. Kirsty Nolan, analyst at Canadean says: “Manufacturers are already capitalising on the trend. In the last few months P&G has launched a range of 'Sleep Serenity' room fragrances under the Febreeze brand which are designed to relax consumers and promote an environment suitable for a good night’s sleep. Brand stores have also responded with The Body Shop launching the 'Deep Sleep' range and Molton Brown with a 'Relax & Sleep Well' range.” Canadean predicts that these market opportunities span beyond personal care, as consumers move on from soothing hot drinks and turn towards over-the-counter sleep enhancing medicines and treatments to help them unwind. 

 

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Editor’s notes

All numbers used here are based on a recent Canadean Consumer survey of answers from 2,000 UK-based adults. The survey was conducted in February 2014.

Febreze Sleep Serenity

 

P&G has launched a range of 'Sleep Serenity' room fragrances under the Febreeze brand which are designed to relax consumers and promote an environment suitable for a good night’s sleep.

Deep Sleep

 

The Body Shop suggests to spritz its 'Deep Sleep Dreamy Pillow & Body Mist' on the body or bedlinen before going to sleep.

Molton Brown Body Wash

Molton Brown claims that its 'Relax & Sleep Well' range contains ingredients that help promote relaxation and aid good rest. 

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0815 or email press@canadean.com

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Most consumers not concerned about halal meathttp://www.canadean.com/news/most-consumers-not-concerned-about-halal-meat/Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/most-consumers-not-concerned-about-halal-meat/A new survey from Canadean finds that while the majority (52%) of UK consumers are not concerned about the consumption of halal meat, a third of adults deliberately avoid halal meat certified products, primarily because of animal welfare concerns.

Consumers who avoid halal meat are concerned about animal welfare

A June 2014 survey of 2,000 British consumers by Canadean found that 32% of consumers say that they deliberately avoid meat products that are certified halal, while 31% say they are concerned about the treatment of animals used to make halal food. However, there is still some lack of awareness when it comes to what halal certified meat actually is. For instance, when 1,000 consumers were asked if they deliberately avoided meat that was certified halal, 32% agreed. However, of the other 1,000 respondents asked slightly differently, 27% claimed to deliberately avoid products where it was clear that the animal had not been stunned prior to slaughter, the main animal welfare concern cited by critics of halal production methods. This shows that a minority of consumers are concerned about halal labeling claims, even if they are unsure of what it is. Irrespective of awareness about halal certified meat, the survey shows that consumers do have concerns about the consumption of halal meat. This could be problematic for retail and foodservice operators in the future, with only 13% of consumers saying they are aware of where halal meat is served.

Ronan Stafford, Senior analyst at Canadean, says: “While this shows that the majority of British consumers are happy to consume halal meat, the data does highlight a significant number of consumers who are concerned that the methods of slaughter used for halal meat are not humane.”

Consumers want to know more about slaughter methods

Canadenan’s survey also finds that half of British consumers think that it should be clear from the packaging of meat products precisely what slaughter method was used. Stafford adds, “Consumers want the best quality meat, and as part of this they’re increasingly interested in production and slaughter methods. Producers of halal meat therefore need to do more to show that they use a humane slaughter method in order to have the best quality product.”

While the majority of consumers aren’t concerned about animal slaughter methods, manufacturers of halal meat could be more transparent, and raise public awareness of their production methods in order to make their product more acceptable.

Halal meat

Last month some of UK's major retailers were accused of selling halal meat without labeling it as such. This sparked a lot of media attention and a public debate on the pros and cons of halal. Here, some skewers of traditional Turkish halal kebabs on the grill. 

 

NOTES

Methodology: Canadean surveyed 2,000 British consumers in June 2014 about their attitudes to ethical food, including kosher, halal, organic and veganism. As part of this survey, respondents were split into two groups: half were surveyed about attitudes to halal meat, and half were surveyed about attitudes to animal slaughter methods.

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports or data. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0818 or email press@canadean.com

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Women over 45 want personalised skincare productshttp://www.canadean.com/news/women-over-45-want-personalised-skincare-products/Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/women-over-45-want-personalised-skincare-products/In the saturated 45+ cosmetics market, women have difficulties finding tailored skincare products among the vast selection of anti-aging cosmetics. Instead of introducing just another magic cure for wrinkles, brands should offer unique and personalised shopping experiences.

Canadean consumer data found that over a fifth of women aged 45+ are on the lookout for individualised and customised skincare products. However, with the huge amount of different anti-aging creams, lotions and tonics, women are having a difficult time choosing the right product for their skin type. Instead they prefer to stick to a simpler regime, as they feel that the choice among the vast selection is time-consuming and confusing. Joanne Hardman, analyst at Canadean, says: “Women develop their skin care routine in their 20’s and stick with it. However, skin changes over the years, meaning skin care regimes should be adapted along the way.” Canadean sees a great potential for brands which offer women over 45 a personalised shopping experience, where they can learn more about different skin care products and effective regimes for their skin types. Hardman believes that brands that can give something unique to their customers will be successful: “There is a real growth opportunity for brands which offer a fine, tailored experience to women over 45, as they are creating brand loyalty among their customers.” 

NIVEA’s campaign targets women between 40 and 60

NIVEA’s ‘Face Facts Boutique’ has created a new campaign for women between the age of 40 and 60 which allows them to learn more about the product range and experience the products for themselves through multi-sensory sampling stations. A NIVEA skin expert will provide free skin consultations using a NIVEA skin technology to analyse women’s skin, advise on the best skincare routines and answer any questions related to aging skin. The ‘Face Facts Boutique’ will visit some of the largest shopping centres in the UK. Hardman predicts that “it won't take long before other cosmetics brands are tapping into NIVEA’s idea.”

 

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Editor’s notes

Nivea Skin Care

NIVEA is taking its 'Cellular Anti-Age' range on the road, using an experimental campaign to attract women between 40 and 60 in shopping centres around the UK. 

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0815 or email press@canadean.com

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Busy Italians consider ice cream as a relaxation therapyhttp://www.canadean.com/news/busy-italians-consider-ice-cream-as-a-relaxation-therapy/Tue, 22 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/busy-italians-consider-ice-cream-as-a-relaxation-therapy/According to a new report from Canadean, Italian consumers are looking to the creamy texture of ice cream to help relax and unwind after a busy day at the office.

Italians who feel stressed and fatigued after a hard day’s work are sure to have their moods uplifted after experiencing the creamy textures of traditional Italian ice cream. Research firm Canadean found that 22.3% of ice cream consumption is led by the need for a comforting moment, to calm down and forget about the pressures of everyday life. Consumers in Italy often look to restore their inner balance, with simple, yet tasty ice cream products which remind them of happy times and inspire childhood memories.

Taste is not everything in ice cream consumption

Unlike other European countries, where the need for the tastiest treat drives the market, this trend only influences 14.5% of consumption in Italy. Consumers look for ice creams in traditional flavours including; chocolate, hazelnut and coffee, which reduces the stress and acts as recuperation mechanism. Joanne Hardman, analysts at Canadean predicts success for these products: “To boost the competition in ice cream market, Italian manufacturers should produce innovative products targeting consumers who seek to relax. As an example, the Italian market should consider Ben & Jerry’s idea to produce ice cream infused with chamomile tea.”

On-the-go ice cream will be in demand

Due to a growing urbanisation in Italy, busy consumers will continue to enjoy their ice cream for a refreshing moment of relaxation and to escape from the pressures of their working life. To adjust to this booming lifestyle, manufacturers should offer products in on-the-go style tubs with a spoon included, or cones with easy to dispose of wrapping, for consumers to enjoy while being on a break or after work. “Retro and heritage brands will also gain success here, as more Italian consumers look for simple flavours and the creamiest textures to act as a pick-me-up treat and stress reliever,” says Hardman.

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Editor’s notes

These findings are based on the new Canadean report: ‘Consumer Trends Analysis: Understanding Consumer Trends and Drivers of Behavior in the Italian Ice Cream Market.’

 

Italian Ice Cream

In Italy over a quarter of ice cream consumption is led by the need for a comforting moment, to calm down and forget about the pressures of everyday life.

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0807 or email press@canadean.com

 

 

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Russia’s older population seek for dairy out of habit rather than health reasonshttp://www.canadean.com/news/russia’s-older-population-seek-for-dairy-out-of-habit-rather-than-health-reasons/Mon, 21 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/russia’s-older-population-seek-for-dairy-out-of-habit-rather-than-health-reasons/Dairy products are a part of traditional food in Russia and have deep roots in consumption patterns, with products such as milk, kefir, sour cream, and cottage cheese being regular part of the diet, says a new report from Canadean.

While one of the main reasons driving Russian dairy market is indulgence, dairy products can boast such age-aligned attributes as calcium for bone strength, protein for muscle mass and maintaining gut health, which match age-aligned needs not just for youngsters, but older consumers as well. Currently, the Russian dairy market offers many products targeted at younger generation; at the same time, there is lack of products specifically targeting those aged 55+, who consume dairy due to the habit rather than health and age-aligned reasons.

Manufactures should emphasise healthy attributes of dairy

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, only half of those in Russia with the condition knew that dairy is the main source of calcium, while 36% believe that dairy causes damage for older people. As a result, manufacturers should consider using packaging, advertising, and campaigns to educate consumers about the osteoporosis and dairy’s role in averting it. According to Veronika Zhupanova, analyst at Canadean, “With careful marketing, manufacturers should encourage older consumers to increase frequency of dairy consumption as a part of healthy and active life-style.” Moreover, age imposed needs motivate 15.6% of total dairy consumption of $15.4bn market. However, if the manufacturers can communicate the importance of dairy in old consumers’ diets, the influence is likely to increase.

The importance of Vitamin D will increase

However, consuming rich in calcium dairy may not be enough as calcium requires vitamin D to facilitate its absorption. A significant proportion of Russia’s territory, especially in the north, has low insolation in winter, which puts its population at risk of lack of vitamin D. To prevent this, manufacturers should launch dairy products rich both in calcium and vitamin D. As an example, Russian manufacturer Valio launched ProFeel range of Yoghurt Shakes which contain vitamin D and less sugar, and are targeted at consumers who lead a healthy lifestyle. According to Zhupanova, “Producers will benefit from launching seasonal editions, providing they educate consumers about the necessity of diet change during winter-time.”

 

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About this report

 

These findings are based on the new Canadean report: ‘Consumer Trends Analysis: Understanding Consumer Trends and Drivers of Behavior in the Russian Dairy Food Market.’ 

Russian Dairy

Currently, older Russian consumers are turning to dairy out of habit rather than specifically to help manage health changes related to the aging process, such as osteoporosis.

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0807 or email press@canadean.com

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Are insects the superfood of the future?http://www.canadean.com/news/are-insects-the-superfood-of-the-future/Fri, 18 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/are-insects-the-superfood-of-the-future/Insects are being touted as the healthy, sustainable food source of the future, but will consumers be willing to dine on bugs? Canadean asked 2000 UK consumers.

Insects are predicted by many to be the superfood of tomorrow and are already popular in fine dining or as a novelty among more adventurous consumers. But will they be able to move beyond a foodie fad and be embraced by the average consumer? The European Union thinks so: it has offered member states US $3 million to research the use of insects in cooking. Similarly, the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation has published a list of almost 2000 edible insect species. With 40 tonnes of insects for every human on earth, insects are an abundant, sustainable food source that is rich in protein, iron and calcium and low in fat and cholesterol. However, they may prove a hard sell among more squeamish consumers. According to Canadean’s survey, 65% of consumers say that they would not be willing to try foods made from processed insects.

Marketing will be key in convincing consumers

A major obstacle to insect eating is palatability. Canadean research finds that consumers who are given detailed, flavour-focused product descriptions are more likely to consider eating insects, with 46% saying they would be willing to try them.  In comparison only 35% are considering trying insects when they are given minimal information about products. The way the insect-derived product is presented and marketed will be key in convincing consumers to give insects a try. According to Catherine O’Connor, senior analyst at Canadean, “Processed insects will be an easier sell than products where consumers can see the insects in front of them. To get past the disgust barrier, insect-derived foods must have a strong visual appeal and not be recognisably bug-based.”

Another way to boost the appeal of insect-derived foods is linking them in flavour and design to cultures where insect eating is more common, such as Africa and south-east Asia. Canadean’s survey finds that 6% of consumers who are willing to try insects would only eat them as part of a foreign cuisine. Moreover, receptiveness to insect-derived foods was higher among those who described themselves as eager to enjoy food from different cultures, with 51% of them willing to try insects. O’Connor explained, “Overall, these findings show that marketers of insect-derived foods will have to work carefully to convince consumers that insects can be a part of their diet. However, the interest is there, especially among those who are hungry for new and exciting food experiences.”

 

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Editor’s notes

 

  Cricket Flour

Chapul’s Thai bar claims to offer a reviving and delicious mix of cricket flour, coconut, ginger and a tangy hint of lime.

 

Grasshoppers

London food start-up Ento creates healthy and sustainable foods using edible insects.

 

  Ant Tart

Denmark’s Noma serves beef tartar and ants as a culinary treat.

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0815 or email press@canadean.com

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Amending trademark rights in Russia will open doors for smaller food manufacturershttp://www.canadean.com/news/amending-trademark-rights-in-russia-will-open-doors-for-smaller-food-manufacturers/Wed, 16 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/amending-trademark-rights-in-russia-will-open-doors-for-smaller-food-manufacturers/The Federation Council in Russia is set to amend the Civil Code to grant the equal rights to manufacturers who wish to use product images on their packaging. This will not only create wider opportunities for new brands, but will  cause a shift in market trends among Russian consumers, claims a research firm Canadean.

According to Izvestia, Russia’s Federation Council plans to amend the intellectual property protocol by protecting local producers against companies with registered trademarks using similar branding. Currently manufacturers with exclusive trademark hold the right to refuse market entry to competitor’s products, demand to withdraw already produced goods, and seek compensation for any damage done. As an example, the owner of Elizaveta brand registered crisp bread as a part of its trademark, and sued its competitors whose products’ featured similar images of  crisp breads on the package.”

Changes to be beneficial for both consumers and brands

Research firm Canadean predicts that the new amendments proposed by Russia’s Federation Council, if acquired, will certainly change the FMCG markets rules in Russia. This will create better conditions for smaller businesses and new entrants. However, the number of companies taking inspiration from each other is set to increase, and more consumers will shift from the original label to a different manufacturer. According to Veronika Zhupanova, analyst at Canadean, “This is highly likely to work well for the consumers, as increased competition can lead to a greater array of choice allowing consumers to choose products that align specifically with their needs.”

Manufacturers will have to take an innovative approach

To counteract this, manufacturers would need to adjust their marketing strategies and increase consumer’s connection with the brands. For example, food and drink manufacturers can do that by underlining quality of the ingredients and how they will benefit consumers, such as highlighting superior taste and functional benefits to stave off competition. “This will push aside already established FMCG brands, who have started to get comfortable in innovating further the formulation and positioning of their products, and create new and more engaging advertising campaigns, attracting consumers and strengthening their connection to the brand,” Zhupanova comments.

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Editor’s notes

 

These insights are based on the article “Companies soon not to be allowed to register the images and product categories” published on 4 July 2014 by Izvestia. To read a full article go to http://izvestia.ru/news/573344.

 

Crisp Bread

The owner of Elizaveta brand registered crisp bread as a part of its trademark, and sued its competitors whose products’ featured similar images of  crisp breads on the package.

 

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0818 or email press@canadean.com

 

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Barista-style machine makes tea exciting againhttp://www.canadean.com/news/barista-style-machine-makes-tea-exciting-again/Tue, 15 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/barista-style-machine-makes-tea-exciting-again/Sharp’s tea espresso machine makes  tea exciting again, while also attracting health-seeking consumers, who spent over US $3.5 billion in the search for healthy tea in 2013.

Launched in Japan in 2014, Sharp’s Healsio Ocha Presso offers a new and fun way of preparing tea. The machine’s modern design – reminiscent of the booming barista culture in the coffee market – will appeal to younger urban consumers who are looking for exciting drinks. Catherine O’Connor, senior analyst at Canadean, says: “Tea’s popularity suffers among younger consumers with some seeing it as a boring and old-fashioned drink.” Those aged 34 and under make up 52% of the global population, however they are only responsible for 42% of tea consumption. This shows that manufacturers need to come up with new and lively ideas to make tea appeal to the young. O’Connor adds: “Retailing at over $200, Sharp’s machine would be an expensive way to target the casual consumer. However, it does provide an innovative example of how tea can be positioned as an exciting alternative to coffee.”

Tea’s health benefitsan opportunity for functional drinks?

Besides its fashionableness, the machine’s slow grinding mechanism also boosts health benefits, as it prevents the loss of fibre and catechin antioxidants from tea leaves. Tea is one of the number one products that consumers look to for health benefits, with almost one in every five cups drunk for this reason. Consumers regularly drink tea to help with a variety of medical issues, ranging from helping with weight loss and mental alertness to cancer, heart disease and high cholesterol. O’Connor explains: “High confidence in tea’s ability to improve health means that consumers will be more trusting of the health claims of functional drinks that use tea as a base than they might be of other offerings. Combined with the growing global interest in the medical benefits of products from the East, the market for tea is likely to grow in the future. This is especially true  for brands that can recapture the interest of younger consumers.”

 

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Editor’s notes

 

Sharp Tea Machine

 

Sharp’s Healsio Ocha Presso offers tea drinkers a health boost in a barista-style design.

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0815 or email press@canadean.com

 

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Japanese cosmetics brand launches beauty salon store for kidshttp://www.canadean.com/news/japanese-cosmetics-brand-launches-beauty-salon-store-for-kids/Tue, 15 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/japanese-cosmetics-brand-launches-beauty-salon-store-for-kids/Shiseido Japan are investing in beauty salons for children, opening a store for their youngest consumers this month in Hyogo followed by another in Tokyo in October.

Shiseido is investing in getting consumers interested in cosmetics at an early age through the launch of beauty salon stores for children in Japan this summer. The company’s beauticians will offer an in-store make-up camp, as well as skincare and nail care lessons. This is not the first time the company has turned their attention towards their youngest consumers, having already run interactive tutorials for children on their website. According to Catherine O’Connor, senior analyst at Canadean, “Shiseido’s move illustrates that while aging populations across the globe are causing many brands to shift their focus to the needs of older consumers, younger demographics also present opportunities.”

Kids consume one in every six cosmetics products

Shiseido’s initiative targets a growing global consumer-base of children, where even the youngest consumers are proving increasingly interested in cosmetics products. Kids aged nine and under are responsible for 9.5% of makeup and skincare consumption globally. Not far behind are ten to fifteen year olds who are responsible for 7.1%. Combined, their consumption was worth over US $13.8 billion globally in 2013 and this figure is set to hit $18.1 billion by 2018. O’Connor says: “To encourage parents to buy products for their children, brands need to present offerings that are specifically formulated for the young. In our survey parents reported that finding age-appropriate products was key when buying cosmetics products for their kids, driving over a third of the overall consumption.” O’Connor adds: “Parents also said that their kids favour products that offer individuality, making personalised products a way through which brands can meet the needs of the young.”

However, brands will have to be careful with the ways in which they target children: “Cosmetic products for youngsters must be positioned around concepts such as having fun, teaching children to take care of their skin and allowing them to express their individuality.” O’Connor continues: “Marketers must be careful not to promote their ranges in ways that could encourage self-image issues among the young or teach them that physical beauty is a goal they must aspire to.”

 

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Editor’s notes

Kids Cosmetics

 

Kids enjoy fun and personalised cosmetics products the most, as they give young consumers more space to express their individuality.

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0815 or email press@canadean.com

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Spain’s older consumers favour indulgent and luxurious confectioneryhttp://www.canadean.com/news/spain’s-older-consumers-favour-indulgent-and-luxurious-confectionery/Mon, 14 Jul 2014 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/spain’s-older-consumers-favour-indulgent-and-luxurious-confectionery/Manufacturers need to switch to premium products, as mature consumers are increasingly health-conscious and save confectionery for the occasional treat, finds news report from Canadean.

When it comes to their confectionery choices, indulgence reigns supreme among older consumers. A recent report from Canadean reveals that the desire for indulgence motivates over two thirds of confectionery consumption among consumers over the age of 55 in Spain, who look to confectionery for treating. However, consumers over the age of 55 only enjoy 148 confectionery items per year. This is quite low compared to teenage consumers aged between 10 and 15 who enjoy 245 occasions per year.

Older consumers increasingly health-conscious 

Older consumers often become increasingly health conscious with age and plan to abstain from high calorie and sugar rich options. As consumers mature, they look for more functional products to meet their age-related needs in categories such as dairy. At the same time they reduce their intake of inherently unhealthy products such as confectionery, saving pralines, chocolates and candy bars for the occasional treat. However, when the need for indulgence takes hold, they forget about health concerns and opt for the most decadent options available.

Manufacturers need to promote decadent flavours

Brands can encourage older consumers to treat themselves and trade up to more premium options by promoting the most decadent flavours and textures. Dark chocolate is the preferred ‘healthier’ confectionery option, due to claims that it is beneficial for heart health and helps improve cognitive function. Joanne Hardman, analyst at Canadean, says: “Products with new and luxurious flavours will be most popular, including both sweet and savory combinations such as Lindt's pomegranate and chili chocolate. Promoting functional benefits can help make consumers fell less guilty about their sugary treats, whilst still offering premium experiences which enhance moments of relaxation.”

 

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Editor’s notes

All market insights from this press release are based on Canadean's report 'Consumer Trends and Analysis: Understanding Consumer Trends and Drivers of Behavior in the Spanish Confectionery Market.'  

Lindt Chocolate 3

 

 

Lindt's dark mousse chocolate with the flavour "pomegranate and chili" is a good example of combining sweet and savoury tastes successfully in confectionery. 

For further information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 20 3220 0815 or email press@canadean.com

 

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