Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com2016-08-18T16:17:31umbracoLatest information from Canadean.enBusy Brits present major opportunity for on-the-go dairy products, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/busy-brits-present-major-opportunity-for-on-the-go-dairy-products,-says-canadean/Thu, 18 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/busy-brits-present-major-opportunity-for-on-the-go-dairy-products,-says-canadean/British consumers are increasingly looking for food and drink that saves time and allows them to feel they have a better work-life balance. Indeed, 50% of British people feel there are not enough hours in the day to fit in all their desired activities, while 56% report making attempts to reduce the time spent on necessary tasks and chores to free up time for more favorable activities, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

According to the company’s latest report, it is crucial that dairy brands introduce products designed specifically with consumers’ tight schedules in mind, as highlighted by these survey results.

Ghina Romani, Analyst for Canadean, states: “Breakfast dairy products are most noticeably in demand, with the number of breakfast drinks, yogurts, and cereal pot launches increasing to capitalize on demand.”

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A further opportunity which time-poor consumers present is the development of products in pouches. In Poland, for example, the Day Up brand launched a breakfast smoothie in a resealable pouch format that does not need refrigeration and is formulated with milk, fruits and ancient grains.

Romani explains: “Products such as this meet consumer demand for both convenient and healthy products, while also resembling the makeup of a more traditional breakfast, which resonates well with shoppers.”

Consumers’ attempts to save time often go beyond simply consuming dairy products on-the-go, as they endeavor to reduce the time spent on cooking and preparing meals. Canadean’s global survey revealed that 37% of consumers in the UK often do not have as much time as they would like to spend on preparing meals or cooking food.

An example of a product which successfully addresses this issue is an item launched by Nabisco in Singapore last year under the Nabisco Easy Cheese banner. The product is a cheddar cheese in an aerosol format that is quick and easy to apply on bread or crackers.

Romani concludes: “UK dairy companies looking to stay ahead of the competition need to design and innovate convenient products such as the Easy Cheese aerosol that meet demand for fast and easy cooking.”

Editor’s notes

- Information based on Canadean’s report: Consumer and Market Insights: Dairy & Soy food in the UK.

- All information correct at time of publication and based on Canadean's research methodology.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Digital lifestyles to change how consumers approach personal health and hygiene, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/digital-lifestyles-to-change-how-consumers-approach-personal-health-and-hygiene,-says-canadean/Tue, 16 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/digital-lifestyles-to-change-how-consumers-approach-personal-health-and-hygiene,-says-canadean/Hygiene categories, traditionally perceived as “quiet” in terms of innovation, will soon see a distinct shift towards systems and products which employ digital tools and unique technologies to better manage personal hygiene, as today’s digitized and connected consumers seek to align this preference across their lifestyles, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

The company’s latest report finds that consumer interest is growing in electronic hygiene devices. By being automated, many of these products benefit from perceived superior efficacy credentials in comparison to traditional counterparts, as consumers seek out the best way to achieve their hygiene goals.

Jamie Mills, Analyst at Canadean, explains: “New technologies designed to target consumers’ hygiene rituals can help to drive interest and excitement around brands and the wider hygiene category by providing unique and disruptive approaches, particularly as devices have mainly been associated with the beauty space.”

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The boom in smartphones has also led to greater interest in more intelligent and integrated solutions, which can monitor and better manage specific facets surrounding personal hygiene, and wellbeing more generally.

Mills adds: “This segment is currently in its infancy within the hygiene space, as evidenced by Canadean’s research. Looking at oral care alone, only 12% of global consumers say they are currently using digital tools such as smartphone apps and wearable devices to monitor or manage their oral hygiene. Nevertheless, a significant opportunity exists to engage consumers using these technologies, with 40% saying that they would use them in future, particularly among tech-savvy millennials.” 

Canadean believes the desire for more proactive, diagnostic, and personalized management of health and hygiene creates important opportunities for players in the hygiene space to pioneer new smartphone-compatible tools, companion apps, and even partnerships with technology brands. One such example of this approach is Oral B’s recently launched GENIUS toothbrush, which combines motion sensor technology in the brush with video recognition in the user’s smartphone camera via a companion app.

Editor’s notes

- Information based on Canadean’s report: Top Trends in Toiletries and Hygiene; Exploring the oral hygiene, personal hygiene, feminine hygiene, and incontinence categories.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Apps could boost alcohol sales among young adults through food pairing suggestions, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/apps-could-boost-alcohol-sales-among-young-adults-through-food-pairing-suggestions,-says-canadean/Thu, 11 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/apps-could-boost-alcohol-sales-among-young-adults-through-food-pairing-suggestions,-says-canadean/The art of pairing food with alcoholic drinks, particularly wine, is a well-established and common practice. Mobile apps, however, are starting to offer a novel way of encouraging consumers not only to pair food and drinks more often, but to consider beverages other than wine when doing so, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

The company’s latest research has found that 35% of consumers worldwide see food pairing as a key consideration when choosing alcoholic drinks. However, this behavior is more prevalent among older adults than younger ones, as the figure rises to 43% of those aged 55 and over, but decreases to 26% for 18-24 year-olds. As such, social media and apps will be crucial tools in encouraging younger consumers to think about food and drink pairing more often.

 

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Ronan Stafford, Senior Analyst for Canadean, explains: “Encouraging young adults to consider pairing alcohol with food will be a crucial way to grow volumes of wine, beer, and even some spirits. Brands need to use highly visual social media platforms, such as Instagram and Snapchat, and even beverage-dedicated apps, to demonstrate to young adults the exciting experiences offered by food and drink pairing. In April 2016, Bloomberg reported that Snapchat users were watching 10 billion videos a day, up from 8 billion in February.

Stafford continues: “Forget 140-character Tweets - social media is now a visual medium. This should play into the hands of brands building around food and drink pairing: videos provide appealing “hero” shots of the food and drink, help to explain the pairing thought process, and educate consumers.”

Brands should also consider consumer-dedicated mobile apps encouraging pairing, or targeting functionality like near-field communication (NFC) and augmented reality. For instance, Johnnie Walker launched an intelligent label with NFC technology, which could send food and drink pairing suggestions to shoppers’ phones.

In addition, the recent success of Pokemon Go shows the potential for augmented reality, with apps featuring phone cameras to layer new pieces of information in front of what consumers can see. Dagschotel beer, from Brouwerij Martens in Belgium, already uses this technology, with characters on the beer labels coming to life when scanned by a phone.

Editor’s notes

- Information based on Canadean’s report: Top Trends in Alcoholic Drinks; Exploring the beer, cider, spirits, and wine categories.

- All information correct at time of publication and based on Canadean's research methodology.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Digital sharing is reshaping consumer behavior and impacting real-world interactions, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/digital-sharing-is-reshaping-consumer-behavior-and-impacting-real-world-interactions,-says-canadean/Mon, 08 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/digital-sharing-is-reshaping-consumer-behavior-and-impacting-real-world-interactions,-says-canadean/Social bonds and sharing occasions have moved from real life to the virtual world as consumers today use multiple digital touchpoints in their everyday lives. With over a third of millennials claiming to use social media to share updates about personal activities and experiences once a week or more, fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) manufacturers must capitalize on today's age of hyper-connection by encouraging consumers to share pictures, videos, and product experiences in a visually engaging way, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

The company's latest report states that virtual sharing is largely driven by younger, digitally native demographics, which manufacturers would benefit from targeting. Senior consumers are the least likely demographic to share updates on social media.

Tanvi Savara, Consumer Insight Analyst at Canadean, explains: "Today's digital landscape has changed the way humans interact, converse, and share experiences with each other. Young consumers in particular now openly post information and images regarding their activities, holiday plans, food and drinks they consume, and even their mood online. Encouraging consumers to do this in relation to products they consume helps to enhance consumer-brand dialogue."

  

Digital connectivity is also spearheading the rise of the sharing economy model, allowing consumers convenient and cost-efficient access to services and products by relying on peer-to-peer interaction. Indeed, access to ownership is becoming more important in today's hyper-connected world.

Savara continues: "Moving forwards, the sharing economy will continue to evolve into new sectors. According to results from Canadean's Q4 2015 global survey, consumers globally are most willing to share food and drinks (36%), their home for a short term, and transportation with people they do not know well, highlighting how consumer behavior is evolving in this digital age.

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"Platforms like OLIO, which claims to be the UK's first food-sharing app designed to combat food waste, address multiple consumer needs and show how modern consumers approach the online world, making it vital for FMCG brands to adapt accordingly."

Editor’s notes

Information based on Canadean’s report: TrendSights Analysis: Sharing; Addressing the consumer need to share products, services, and experiences.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com.

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Kvass, East Europe’s Traditional Fermented Soft Drink, Ticks Health Trend Boxes, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/kvass,-east-europe’s-traditional-fermented-soft-drink,-ticks-health-trend-boxes,-says-canadean/Thu, 04 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/kvass,-east-europe’s-traditional-fermented-soft-drink,-ticks-health-trend-boxes,-says-canadean/Kvass, traditional to markets such as Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and the Baltic States, accounts for 6% of the East European carbonates market, and has evolved over the years, according to consumer insight company Canadean.

The company’s report states that there are two distinct types of kvass, with overall volumes of around one billion liters in East Europe. Traditionally, kvass was made at home by fermenting bread with water and sugar to produce a naturally fizzy, mild-tasting drink with a malt/cereal flavor.

Naturally-brewed kvass is typically produced by brewers and consumed as a non-alcoholic alternative to beer. Old-style fermented bulk/barrel kvass made from bread waste or malted cereal is still often dispensed in barrels in the street during April to September, and has a shelf-life of 1-2 days.

Antonella Reda, Product Development Manager at Canadean, explains: “Rich in B vitamins and containing beneficial bacteria due to its fermentation, kvass is still widely consumed in countries such as Russia not only for its thirst-quenching properties, but for its healthy digestive benefits.”

The kvass market was revolutionized by the brewer Ochakovo in 2001 with the launch of the first premium-priced kvass product under its Ochakovskiy brand. This product had a long shelf life of 3-6 months and was packed in 150cl PET. Many local brewers and multinational soft drinks producers, such as Coca-Cola and PepsiCo, followed suit, while multinational brewers, such as Heineken and Carlsberg, also include kvass in their portfolios by virtue of their acquisition activities and local market focus.

Flavored kvass drinks, under legislation specifically in Russia and Belarus, must be labelled as ‘kvass-flavored’ to differentiate them from the naturally brewed product. Flavored kvass sales have, however, been consistently falling since reaching a peak of 622 million liters in 2007 in East Europe.

Reda continues: “Fermented kvass has benefited from consumer preference shifting towards naturally-derived and perceived healthier, less artificially-processed beverages. However, with Russia being the key consumption market in East Europe, overall kvass volumes contracted in 2015 as consumers cut back on their spending in a climate of recession.”

Interestingly, in China, where the probiotic benefits of fermentation have long been understood, two companies launched kvass with some success in 2013, namely Hangzhou Wahaha Group and Harbin Qinlin Libaosi Food Co. While Wahaha’s volumes have contracted after shifting focus to its core categories, Qinlin and smaller companies showed robust growth in 2015.

Ochakovskiy Kvass (Ochakovo)

Editor’s notes

Information based on Canadean’s QBT1-16 Special Focus on Local Soft Drinks Products in the Quarterly Beverage Tracker First Quarter 2016: East Europe.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com.

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Fun and Flavor Experimentation to Escalate E-Cigarette Consumption, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/fun-and-flavor-experimentation-to-escalate-e-cigarette-consumption,-says-canadean/Wed, 27 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/fun-and-flavor-experimentation-to-escalate-e-cigarette-consumption,-says-canadean/Fun and flavor experimentation are key elements driving tobacco innovation, paving the way for the electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) market to grow, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

The company’s latest report states that 55% of smokers worldwide smoke because tobacco makes them feel good and they enjoy it.

Canadean believes that consumers’ desire for self-indulgence and enjoyment can be targeted by e-cigarette manufacturers, as an emphasis on fun will help attract sensation-seekers. As a result, e-cigarettes will become an important category for formulating and positioning around pleasure, as they are easier to flavor than traditional cigarettes, and their versatility also encourages experimentation.

Furthermore, heavy taxation on cigarettes means that vaping liquids are often cheaper. Flavor innovation in traditional cigarettes will be more difficult, due to anti-smoking campaigns such as calls for bans on menthol capsule cigarettes.

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Kirsty Nolan, Senior Analyst for Canadean, explains: “With e-cigarettes being a less regulated category and seen as a healthier alternative to traditional tobacco, it becomes a promising category to explore should companies wish to tap further into the ’fun’ trend.

“For example, the Jukasa Dual Tank Pro E-Cigarette features a dual-heating flavor chamber that can work independently to provide separate flavors, or simultaneously to blend two flavors, thus giving users the option to enjoy three flavors in one unit."

The move to increasing numbers of consumers seeking fun products spans beyond the tobacco industry. Longer working hours and commutes, paired with constant connection through social media, often leave consumers with the perception of having less time, which leads them to seek escapism through their consumption.

“Fun and novelty can facilitate moments of escapism for consumers, allowing them to momentarily relax ahead of their next challenge. Canadean expects demand for such products to continue to increase, as lifestyles are ever busier,” Nolan concludes.

 

Editor’s notes

Comments provided by Kirsty Nolan, Senior Analyst for Canadean.

Information based on Canadean’s report: Top Trends in Tobacco and Anti-Smoking; Exploring the cigarettes, cigars, smokeless, and anti-smoking categories.

All information correct at time of publication and based on Canadean's research methodology.

 

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Many Millennials Shun Practice of Eating Three Regular Meals a Day, with Over 40% Snacking Regularly, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/many-millennials-shun-practice-of-eating-three-regular-meals-a-day,-with-over-40-snacking-regularly,-says-canadean/Wed, 13 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/many-millennials-shun-practice-of-eating-three-regular-meals-a-day,-with-over-40-snacking-regularly,-says-canadean/Over a third of consumers globally say they snack regularly, with the figure rising to just over 40% for young people aged 18-34, as the practice of modular eating becomes more accepted as an alternative to eating three main meals a day, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

Regular Snackers 

The company’s latest report finds that consumers snack for a variety of reasons such as the functional need for an energy or nutritional boost, the psychological need to de-stress or indulge, and needs dictated by occasion, such as watching a movie, attending a sporting event, or socializing with friends.

 

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As more consumers turn to snacks to fulfill a wide range of needs and occasions every day, the potential opportunities for snacking brands are enormous right across the health-indulgence and sweet-savory spectrums.

Katrina Diamonon, Principal Consumer Insight at Canadean, explains: “While it is important for brands to acknowledge and address the snacking needs of all consumers, it is particularly crucial to understand the motivations of younger consumers. Not only are they more frequent snackers, but their purchase behaviors and preferences will strongly influence other current consumers and also subsequent generations as they pass on these traits to their children.” 

Canadean finds that a range of rational and emotional needs beside hunger can be addressed through snacking, and these reasons differ according to age. As millennials tend to prioritize meat in their diets more highly than their older counterparts due to its perceived health benefits, manufacturers should capitalize on the meat snack segment and explore new opportunities.

Diamonon continues: “Manufacturers are increasingly experimenting with a range of proteins, formats, and gourmet flavors to elevate consumption from convenience-store snacks to an exciting taste experience and even credible meal replacement. Improved sourcing transparency and ethical production of such offerings is also enhancing premium credentials.”

Editor’s notes

Information based on Canadean’s report: Top Trends in Snacks, Confectionery, and Desserts; Exploring consumer and innovation trends in key categories.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Consumers Consider Memory Loss and Sight Degeneration Bigger Health Worries than Diabetes and Cholesterol, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/consumers-consider-memory-loss-and-sight-degeneration-bigger-health-worries-than-diabetes-and-cholesterol,-says-canadean/Tue, 12 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/consumers-consider-memory-loss-and-sight-degeneration-bigger-health-worries-than-diabetes-and-cholesterol,-says-canadean/Memory loss and eye health are two of the most pressing future health concerns among today’s consumers, presenting a major opportunity for players in the nutrition and over-the-counter health space, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

Canadean’s latest report finds that almost a third of consumers (32%) globally are concerned about experiencing memory loss in the future, and 27% are concerned about sight degeneration, putting such concerns above diabetes and cholesterol in terms of consumer worry. In this way, there is a clear opportunity for manufacturers to respond by incorporating cognitive and eye health benefits into food, drinks and supplements.

Top 5Health Concerns 

Melanie Felgate, Senior Consumer Insight Analyst at Canadean, comments: “As well as addressing current health needs, consumers are increasingly looking to the future, proactively seeking products that will reduce their risk of potential health problems. With memory loss and eye health the top concerns, manufacturers in the functional nutrition and healthcare spaces should focus on these key areas of innovation. For example, cholesterol-lowering spreads are commonplace, but what about everyday products which improve cognitive function? Coffee Blenders Think Cup in the US is an example of a brand already doing this, producing coffee pods with ginseng which, the brand claims, is clinically proven to improve memory.”

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In terms of the administration of health-enhancing ingredients, consumers prefer food and drink over pills. Only 14% of consumers globally consider traditional pills and tablets to be the preferable consumption format, with the majority opting for food and drink formats. Furthermore, just 18% consider pills and tablets to be the most effective consumption format, compared to 49% and 24% for food and drink respectively. 

Felgate continues: “This preference for, and perceived effectiveness of, food and drinks in comparison to pills, stems from boredom with traditional formats as well as the belief that food and drink can offer comparable health benefits to non-prescription medicines.”

Manufacturers might also benefit from personalizing health products. Globally, 41% of consumers have a favorable perception of products personalized to their needs. This sentiment increases among the most health conscious consumer groups, such as frequent exercisers (44%) and those who claim to actively use food and drink to improve their health (49%), highlighting the necessity for brands in the health space to take a more personal approach.

Felgate explains: “The need for innovation ever-more closely aligned to individual consumer requirements is growing, as the personalized health trend persists. Brands could personalize products by appealing to consumers’ specific age and gender, lifestyle preferences, or even blood type or DNA. We are already seeing brands like ManFlu – a range of cold and flu remedies for men - capitalize on this space, but in the future personalization will become increasingly more closely tailored to an individual’s own needs.”

Editor’s notes

Information based on Canadean’s report: Top Trends in Healthcare and OTC; Exploring the over-the-counter medication; vitamins, minerals and supplements; functional food and drink; and sports nutrition categories.

All information correct at time of publication and based on Canadean's research methodology.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Baby Beauty Products Require Sensitive Approaches to Appeal to Parents, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/baby-beauty-products-require-sensitive-approaches-to-appeal-to-parents,-says-canadean/Wed, 06 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/baby-beauty-products-require-sensitive-approaches-to-appeal-to-parents,-says-canadean/While adults have long been expected to maintain certain grooming standards, particularly as social media and the selfie culture continues to reign, the emerging “baby beauty” trend, targeting parents of those aged four years and under, is a recent phenomenon in the industry, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

The company’s research demonstrates how regionally, parents in South and Central America are the most likely to be concerned about their babies’ appearance, with 9 in 10 parents in the area stating that their child’s looks are important. The least child image conscious consumers are in North America, where 7 in 10 parents have the same attitude. Interestingly, when it comes to country analysis, Russians took the first place, with 98% of parents having the same attitude, whereas New Zealanders came out as the least image conscious, with 53%.

Personal care brands need to position baby beauty products as fun, rather than image-enhancing

Veronika Zhupanova, analyst at Canadean explains: “The fact that even in the least child-image conscious country over half of parents with babies are concerned about their children’s looks shows how important this consciousness around baby aesthetics has become.”

That said, brands need to navigate carefully so as to avoid entering the terrain of unethical product positioning whilst still aligning neatly with consumer motivations.

Zhupanova notes: “An optimum strategy here would be for manufacturers to promote a holistic approach to a child’s image, placing the primary emphasis on babies’ health, wellbeing and happiness. Doing so will help parents avoid feeling overly pressured about their children’s image, as well as to prevent children from being obsessed with their looks from an early age.”

To further avoid being seen as encouraging image-consciousness among the youngest generation, brands need to focus on the emotive side of the product, such as how it facilitates bonding between parents and children, as opposed to actually enhancing a child’s looks.

“Launches such as child-safe nail polish, for example, should be marketed as facilitating mother-daughter bonding, encouraging a healthier approach to a child’s perception of their own image,” adds Zhupanova.

 

Nail Polish

Organic edible nail polish - such as this one from Kid Licks - can be positioned as a fun accompaniment to parent-child time, promoting a healthy attitude to baby beauty products.

 

Editor’s notes

Information based on Canadean’s report: Top Trends in Baby Care; Exploring the baby food, drinks, toiletries, and diapers categories.

All information correct at time of publication and based on Canadean's research methodology.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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Developing Economies Set to Drive 4.6% Growth in Global Dairy and Soy Food Market by 2020, says Canadeanhttp://www.canadean.com/news/developing-economies-set-to-drive-46-growth-in-global-dairy-and-soy-food-market-by-2020,-says-canadean/Tue, 05 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMThttp://www.canadean.com/news/developing-economies-set-to-drive-46-growth-in-global-dairy-and-soy-food-market-by-2020,-says-canadean/The global dairy and soy food market will rise from US$617.9 billion in 2015 to US$773.4 billion by 2020, representing a compound annual growth rate of 4.6%, according to consumer insight firm Canadean.

The company’s latest report states that this cautious growth will be driven primarily by emerging and developing markets in Asia-Pacific (APAC), Middle East and Africa (MEA) and East European regions, in contrast to West Europe and North America, whose economic fragility has resulted in risks of weaker market growth.

According to Kiran Akkineni, Analyst for Canadean: “Changing consumer preferences and purchase patterns due to socio-economic and demographic changes have created new market dynamics. While the key markets of Western Europe and North America have witnessed stagnancy in liquid milk consumption paired with fast growth in processed and soy products, developing countries have recorded steep growth in demand for dairy products owing to their fairly low per capita consumption.”

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Consumption of milk in North America is currently declining as consumers opt for alternative beverages such as juices and vitamin-infused water. By contrast, the rise in per capita consumption of dairy by the growing middle-class population in developing markets in the APAC, MEA and Eastern Europe regions will drive growth in the dairy and soy foods market.

Canadean’s analysis reveals that consumers in developed markets tend to base their beverage choices on their level of personalization, whether they can be consumed on-the-go, and whether they can provide a novel experience. Consumers in emerging countries including Brazil, China and India, on the other hand, place a greater emphasis on nutritional value, following health and wellness trends.

Akkineni continues: “Despite these regional differences in beverage consumption, value-for-money remains an important differentiating factor globally, as consumers opt for products perceived to provide this. Consequently, there is considerable rise in demand for discount brands and private label products. The global dairy and soy food market is highly fragmented with the top 5 brands holding less than 6% market share. Mengniu, Activia, Amul, Kraft and Yili were the leading brands by market share in 2015.”

Notes

Information based on Canadean’s report: Global Dairy & Soy Food Report; Analysis of opportunities offered by high growth economies.

All information correct at time of publication and based on Canadean's research methodology.

For more information

Please get in contact if you have any questions to this or other Canadean reports. Analysts are available to comment. Contact the Canadean press office on +44 (0) 161 359 5822 or email press@canadean.com

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